In the age of the internet, you’re constantly being bombarded with health tips and tricks that may be questionable at best. Unfortunately, many of those are spreading false information. False health information leads to misinformed and potentially dangerous conditions in your day to day life. Lucky for you, we’re here to set the record straight! These are a few of the most common health myths you’ve probably heard over the years.

Cutting Calories = Weight Loss

Fad diets come and go, but most of these diets include drastic calorie cutting. This form of a starvation diet is sure to offer quick results, but it does not equal real weight loss. Starvation diets have a high rate of rebound weight gain and a very low rate of long-term success. Instead, aim to eat a healthy and balanced diet if you want long-term results.

Cracking Knuckles Causes Arthritis

Everyone has heard this myth at one point or another. Cracking your knuckles results in a loud popping sound, so it’s understandable where the myth comes from, but it isn’t true. The sound that you hear is actually bubbles of fluid in between your joints bursting. These bubbles will reappear and you won’t be left with arthritis. However, if you’re a habitual knuckle-cracker you may be left with some slight swelling of your hands.

You Get a Flu from the Flu Shot

Each year the CDC begs people to get their flu shot and each year we still face a flu outbreak due to those who choose not to vaccinate. One of the excuses used by those who opt out is that they believe the flu shot gives them the flu, but this simply isn’t true. Vaccines use a weakened version of a virus in a very small amount to give your body the ability to develop antibodies, but it’s impossible for it to actually cause an illness. In fact, little to no symptoms are associated with the flu shot besides slight injection site soreness.

Cold Weather Causes Colds

We’ve all been lectured to put a hat on before going out in the cold to avoid catching a cold, and while keeping warm is smart, it turns out the cold can’t actually cause a cold. The only way to catch an illness is to come in direct contact with the bacteria or virus. Colds are more common during times of cold weather, but the weather itself isn’t to blame!

Next time you hear a potential health myth, ask your physician about the truth behind it before you jump on board.